Playing Scum and Villainy

Hello Internet Friends! (Probably just Friend. Thanks for reading my Blog Mrs Dan Sucks at Gaming). Welcome back to another installment of my awful blog.

Scum and Villainy

Today I wanted to talk about a new Table Top Role Playing Game I’ve started with some friends. It’s called “Scum and Villainy” by Stras Scimovic and John Leboeuf-Little, from Evil Hat Games. Its a fanatasic sci-fi It’s based on the Blades in the Dark game by John Harper, also published by Evil Hat Games.

We’ve played a few sessions so far, and I’ve liked it so much I started a second game with some more friends so I can play it even more.

The system is just so different from other games I’ve played in the past. While I cut my RPG teeth on TMNT & Other Strangeness and it’s percentile based dice system, I’ve mostly played Dungeons and Dragons over the years. I’ve mostly been a D20 or D100 system TTRPG player. Games like Dungeons and Dragons or Call of Cthulhu, or even Old School RPG’s like Dungeon Crawl Classics. I’ve played a few other games which I would label as non-traditional or maybe new wave like the Fate based Dresden Files RPG and Fiasco, but I’ve certainly been more into the traditional TTRPGs. And even games that are just trying to be different like the Fantasy Flight Star Wars system. I had played the West End Games version in my youth (so many d6’s) but havnt played that in years.

I’ve run D&D campaigns for 3.5, 4e and 5e with 4e being the game I’ve probably played the most in my history. My favorite system right now is absolutely 5e and I run a regular game of the on roll20.

Scum and Villainy, and it’s predecessor Forged in the Dark game, Blades in the Dark, is just so much fun. It’s narrative driven and much less crunchy then the other games I’ve played in the past outside of maybe Fate. It uses d6’s for all the skill roles, but relatively sparingly. There some really neat mechanics that I’ve never run into before with gaming such as the use of Position and Effect, and structured downtime activities and the Faction portion.

By far my favorite part of the system has to be the use of the flashback mechanic in play. I came across the flashback mechanic for the first time in Dusk City Outlaws from Scratchpad Publishing. Scratchpad is led by an amazing game designer Rodney Thompson who was part of the Wizards team that built D&D, the Lords of Waterdeep board game, Star Wars Saga edition and currently works for Bungie. I was in love with DCO when I found it on kickstarter and over the summer of 2018 I watched tons of actual play videos of the game in action. The Leverage style heist games really evoked the feel of one of my favorite series of novels, The Gentleman Bastards series (Lies of Locke Lamoa) from Scott Lynch.

The flashback mechanic in that game really helped to drive the fast pace of the game and give it a neat feel you don’t find in many other games. One of the most painful parts of d&d adventures can be the 30 minutes the group spends planning out how they are going to break into the villains compound. With a flashback mechanic you can skip those parts and still feel as if your characters are competent and planned for everything.

For example, in our game this past weekend, the crew was using a Deception Plan to get on board an asteroid scientific outpost to steal a prototype shuttle with a cloaking field. They used a sway roll to convince a group of guards and a technician to plug a coax cable for their music performance into a jack near an airlock. They flash backed to rigging the air lock to vent when the guards approached, allowing them to dispose of the guards effortlessly, all for some meager stress!

The mechanic is alot of fun and leads to some interesting interaction and ideas via game play.

This game is quickly turning into one of my favorites! Catch one of our streams when we play on www.twitch.com/danthehut !

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